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Many people believe that the Lucas bill is a new law but there is already a law in Virginia and the Lucus bill is an attempt to modify it. The current law reads  

 § 18.2-433.2. Paramilitary activity prohibited.

A person shall be guilty of unlawful paramilitary activity, punishable as a Class 5 felony if he:

1. Teaches or demonstrates to any other person the use, application, or making of any firearm, explosive or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, knowing or having reason to know or intending that such training will be employed for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder; or

2. Assembles with one or more persons for the purpose of training with, practicing with, or being instructed in the use of any firearm, explosive or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder.

Lucas added another section

3. Assembles with one or more persons with the intent of intimidating any person or group of persons by drilling, parading, or marching with any firearm, any explosive or incendiary device, or any components or combination thereof.

2. That the provisions of this act may result in a net increase in periods of imprisonment or commitment. Pursuant to §30-19.1:4 of the Code of Virginia, the estimated amount of the necessary appropriation cannot be determined for periods of imprisonment in state adult correctional facilities; therefore, Chapter 854 of the Acts of Assembly of 2019 requires the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission to assign a minimum fiscal impact of $50,000. Pursuant to §30-19.1:4 of the Code of Virginia, the estimated amount of the necessary appropriation cannot be determined for periods of commitment to the custody of the Department of Juvenile Justice.

She struck the word “or” from section 1 and added it to section 2.

 

The bill has already stirred a nationwide debate. Many public and social media comments express shock, disbelief, and anger of the proposal. The “technique capable” language has many martial artist instructors very concerned.

 

Supporters of the bill claim that it is only aimed at people that seek to disrupt society, “for the purposes of intimidation” and “promoting civil unrest.” They refer back to the current law and note that it has not been abused by law enforcement.

 

Others see it differently. A man identified as Anthony wrote on the comments section “The bill says “for the purposes of intimidation” and “promoting civil unrest.” Seems alright on the surface but who determines what either of those mean?”

 

Another poster stated “If this bill passes then I would be guilty of showing my son how to properly use a firearm. It would also make us guilty of going to a gun range to practice with a friend. If this passes it could cause problems in my opinion.”

 

The bill has now been referred to Committee for Courts of Justice.